How much Energy is Channel to Cramming - ETCSINES

How much Energy is Channel to Cramming - ETCSINES



To cram, or to read? That is the question for most university students heading into final exams.

Studying throughou t the semester is the best course of action for learning, but students often find themselves between a rock and a hard place come exam time. Cramming has become a common and sometimes celebrated form of studying. One survey of university  students found that 99 percent of the participants admitted to cramming. But when looking at the science, it appears to be a rather poor method of learning. Here are all the ways students exert energy in cramming , and how you should study instead.

**Sleep Is Essential:
Beyond the false belief that cramming works, the major problem with cramming is lack of sleep.  sacrificing sleep to cram for exam is actually counterproductive. In fact, no matter how much a student studies a day, if they sacrifice sleep in order to do so they are likely to have more academic problems the following day. No matter the participant,longer study hours were associated with academic problems, because they usually meant less sleep for the student. The bottom line is pulling all-nighters may seem like a badge of honor, but they do nothing to improve learning or test scores the following day.

According to research, your entire academic performance that week could be compromised. A sleep expert, Dan Taylor , also says that studying your hardest concepts right before you fall asleep encourages better recall the next day.

**Space It Out, Don’t Cram It In:spacing out studying was more effective than cramming for 90 percent of the participants, yet 72 percent thought that cramming had been more beneficial to their academic performance. Taking breaks for longer periods between study sessions gives students better recall than cramming. When you are able to review material more than once you are able to comprehend and recall more of it. To be more specific, psychologists have found the best time between two study periods is 10 percent of the time between the final exam and the second study session. The idea is not to wait too close to the exam, but not so far that you won’t remember what you’ve studied.

If you’re left with no other option before a test, do your best to study as well as you can without .A lack of sleep is what dooms exam performance, not how much you study. And when the next study period starts, remember that regular periods of studying will save you all the stress and sleepless nights cramming, and will actually give you a better performance come test day. And even more important – it will lay the foundation for actually remembering what you have learned when you need it in your jobs after graduation.

**Cramming, while you might have to do it on one test, is going to F-you in the final if you don't go back over it and study like a champion
** - Review previous exams
** Read it, write it down, say it, wait like 2 minutes, and try to remember it. The more sensory modalities you encode the information into, the more likely you are to learn it. Re-potentiating a neuron after several minutes will better ensure that it goes from short term memory to long term memory.
 ** Find the core topic objectives, the rest is just supporting information.
**Do the practice questions in the book. Professors don't usually have that much time to prepare exams, and an easy shortcut for them is slightly change the questions in the book.
**Pretend you are making up the exam. What questions would you ask...
**Wake up at least 2 hours before your exam. Different parts of your brain wake up at different rates.
**** cramming is meant for the lazy ones.let see the reading aspect. Figure out what classes you are going to take next semester. You will either have summer or winter break in the meantime. Buy the books then. Start reading. If you read 1 chapter a week before the semester starts, you will know what the teacher is talking about in lecture, and you will Ace the first exam no problem.

Reading is next to overlearning. Imagine all this...
A violinist doesn’t stop practicing when she has memorized the music. Every time she plays, it takes less energy, allowing her to concentrate on other ways to improve her performance, such as infusing emotion into her music.

*A dancer may work on the same move so many times that she feels as if she could do it perfectly while sleeping. This doesn’t stop her from repeating that same move. Committing the move to memory is a necessity; she lowers any chance of error with each practice session.

What do all of these examples require? “Long hours of repetitive practice . But it is during this overlearning phase, when the body is operating on 'cruise control,' (that) the mind and its intuition kicks in and initiates tiny changes that make a performance sing,” she notes.
In our work as students preparing for standardized exams , overlearning is a key component. The more familiar students are with a test — its format, instructions, question types, strategies, etc., — the more mental capacity will be available for them during the test to do the hard work of problem-solving and thinking critically about the questions on the test.

Written by: Juliet Akomolafe


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