Solutions To Misplaced Academic Priority - ETCSINES

Solutions To Misplaced Academic Priority - ETCSINES


Uhmmm, getting your academic priorities right on the track requires you to prioritize your goals. Lot of students can’t even ascertain their priorities in life not to talk of academic priorities.  Well, to make things easier; let's take a look at priorities. 
Priorities
  You hear a lot about this concept. “You need to get your priorities right. What does that even mean? Today, we’re going to  lick priorities once and for all because if you truly understand this concept … well, the sky isn’t the limit. The things we focus on are the things we get. Period. Good or bad. When we focus on something, we move towards it, consciously and subconsciously developing behaviours to get there. This is the power of priorities. It’s taking a stand and saying, “I want this” and giving the time to that thing first, ensuring that if anything is getting done in this life of yours, it’ll be that . With priorities, you can get what you want. Without them, hopefully it comes together by chance. 

We all go through different phases in our lives, and some of those phases have transitional periods where our day-to-day lives can be a bit more confusing than normal. Sometimes these phases get dragged out, or we don’t even know why we’re in them to begin with, and suddenly we look around we’re not quite on the path we meant to be on. When you don’t have your priorities in order, it’s easy to go off the rails, and while it’s certainly possible to get back on track, you first have to be aware of the problem. Here’s how to tell if you need to get your priorities straight so you can move on with your life. When everything becomes a priority, nothing is a priority. In fact,  people hardly ever used the plural “priorities”. They seemed content to only have one “priority”*. No wonder we struggle with having three, five or even ten of them.

    Prioritizing is about making choices. Am I going to spend more time with my books, or write a book in my evening hours? Will I go to bed early, read overnight, meet up with my academic pursuit ? It’s therefore also about saying no. If you make one thing a priority, you will have to say no to all the other things . You therefore also need to know what’s important to you, and be decisive.

To prioritize well, you need to:
1. Have goals, to determine what’s truly important and what’s not.
2. Say no a lot, so you can focus on your true priority.
3. Not be too afraid of making the wrong decision.

Instead of trying to “ get better at prioritizing ”, you probably need to look deeper and identify which of the above three skills you need to improve. You might not set goals. Maybe you find it very difficult to say no. Or you always worry about making the perfect decision, effectively making you indecisive. It's not about brains, or about the amount of time spent studying. Many of the highest-scoring students attribute their success to some surprisingly simple habits. How do super-achievers do it? Brains aren’t the only answer. Top grades don’t always go to the brightest students . Knowing how to make the most of your innate abilities counts for more. Infinitely more. Students with high I.Q.s sometimes don’t do as well as classmates with lower I.Q.s. For them, learning comes too easily and they never find out how to buckle down.

Hard work isn’t the whole story, either. It’s not how long you sit there with the books, it’s what you do while you’re sitting. Indeed, some of these students actually put in fewer hours of homework time than their lower-scoring classmates. Here are some homework help tips straight from teachers. The students  at the top of the class get there by mastering a few basic techniques that others can readily learn. Top students brook no intrusions on study time. Once the books are open or the computer is booted up, phone calls go unanswered, TV shows unwatched, snacks ignored. Study is business; business comes before recreation. Here are some time management strategies all successful people. Here, according to education experts and students themselves, are the secrets of getting tuned to your priorities:

GET ORGANISED: In high school, you could be so busy, that you couldn’t waste time looking for a pencil or missing paper. You would keep  everything right where you could put your hands on it. Maintains two folders: one for the day’s assignments, another for papers completed and graded. File the day’s papers in color-coded folders by subject so they’ll be available for review at exam time. Even students who don’t have a private study area remain organized. A backpack or drawer keeps essential supplies together and cuts down on time-wasting searches.

LEARN HOW TO READ: An average student should be willing to read at every point in time. The best graduating student in Joseph Ayo Babalola University 2017 class, recalled that she reads her notes every time which gives her an insight of what she was taught and ought to know. Regular reading makes her get accustomed to every line and topic requested for. Although, it is not easy but the price must be paid. Learn the act of  speed-reading.  Learn to look at a book’s table of contents, graphs and pictures first. Then, when you began to read, you have a sense of the material, and you retain a lot more.  The secret of good reading is to be “an active reader one who continually asks questions that lead to a full understanding of the author’s message.”

SCHEDULE YOUR TIME: When a teacher assigns a long paper,  draw up a timetable, dividing the project into small pieces so it isn’t so overwhelming. It’s like eating a steak, you chew it one bite at a time. Of course, even the best students procrastinate sometimes. But when that happens, they face up to it. Sometimes it comes down to late nights, still if you want A’s, you make sure to hit the deadline.

TAKE GOOD NOTES AND USE THEM: Reading the textbook is important, but your teacher is going to test you on what he or she emphasized. That’s what you find in your notes. Learn the things teachers wish they could tell you . The top students also take notes while reading the text assignment. Just before the bell rings, most students close their books, put away papers, whisper to friends and get ready to rush out. 

SPEAK UP: If you don’t understand the principle your  teacher is explaining in economics,  ask him to repeat it. Class participation goes beyond merely asking questions, though. It’s a matter of showing intellectual curiosity. Better grades come from better understanding.

DO MORE THAN YOU ARE ASKED:  The more you practice, the more you learn. The most important “secret” of the super-achievers is not so secret. For almost all straight-A students, the contribution of their parents was crucial. From infancy, the parents imbued them with a love for learning. They set high standards for their kids, and held them to those standards. They encouraged their sons and daughters in their studies but did not do the work for them. In short, the parents impressed the lessons of responsibility on their kids, and the kids delivered which they imbibe as they grow up  .

Writer: Juliet Akomolafe

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