A Student's Mandate - ETCSINES

A Student's Mandate - ETCSINES


Mandate is an official order to do something. In the real world, it is mandatory for every student to have a goal which comes with a price and every price comes with a reward. A student's mandate is an order from a superior mind attached with a fantastic output which yields success. 

Success would only be far fetched for people with optional motives. Your mandate is the driving force, it is just like a company's vision and mission in which the company must target to get an awesome output. Permit me to use my favourite game, temple run”, if there is nothing pursuing me, I can't keep running despite the hustle and bustle on my way,I keep running and while running. 

I begin to accumulate more coins and other quests. With that on my mind, I have a target and it is mandatory for me to achieve my goal. For every step, level and bus stop a student gets to, there should be a mandate.
 Part of being in school is the sense of community that comes from your cohort and your research -ideas shared in a robust and challenging environment are what form the questions and drive the discoveries we make. You can only be a part of that through providing places, spaces, and opportunities to meet and share the ideas that make life an exciting journey. Your mandate rests on three pillars that form and drive your vision;
• Sustainability
• Advocacy, and 
• Engagement
 Work for a financial and organizationally sustainable grade with a strong voice advocating for other students’ needs, that engages students academically and socially. These three pillars are what will continue to sustain you in the educational and industrial world. In spite of ample evidence of the value of learning, efforts too often fall short of what is needed. Students fail to graduate from high school. Others earn a diploma but do not have the skills to succeed in college. Many of those who undergo university programs do not complete a degree or credential. Even those students who successfully complete degrees often stop with their learning. High school graduation, college readiness, college completion, and lifelong learning are essentials for a well-educated population. 

We all must commit to learning. These skills and competencies include the ability to think critically and solve complex problems, work collaboratively, communicate effectively, and pursue self-directed learning or metacognition.

In addition, we must be aware of how today's digital environment introduces subtle and significant shifts in learning. In this issue of ETCISNES, the challenge is to go beyond skills and technologies and to think in terms of literacies, particularly social media literacies: attention, participation, collaboration, network awareness, and critical consumption. Every students need to learn how to exercise mindful deployment of our attention. What matters is not the act of distribution, but the act of consumption; The power is now in the hands of those who control the limited resource of attention which is YOU. 
Learn how to stay in the "information flow" and have the discipline to not simply consume what we like or what is easy to access. Authority is no longer vested in the writer 
and the publisher. The consumer of information has to be a critic and has to inquire about the reality of the information presented. Attention stems naturally from engagement there are variety of ways in which technology have committed to enabling learning by engaging students . Their strategies involve using new 
technologies such as social media and digital storytelling to deepen students' involvement and capitalizing on technology through asynchronous communication and podcasts to support as many students as possible. The result comes from engaged learners who "work willingly, instead of by coercion, and approach their assignments as something that matters to them personally." 

 Finally, in addition to committing to education , pedagogies, literacies, and skills that increase engagement and focus attention, we must commit to helping the next generation of students move beyond the common "loss points," or challenges, such as enrolment, scheduling, engagement, and advising. For the Next Generation, we have evidence of mandates that work. But we are not successful with enough students. Too many efforts remain as pilot programs that affect only small 
numbers of students. Perhaps the greatest challenge of information technology and education is to commit to implementing the strategies that we know work to improve learning—by scaling effective programs to reach the millions of learners who need education which involves more than increasing the number of adoptions, however. 

It requires a focus on instructional change at a deeper level, it requires a rethinking of beliefs, and it requires a sense of ownership. We have in hand many of the tools, policies, and technologies to create the next generation of learning. Although many institutions and individuals are committed to addressing these challenges, and are making progress, we must do more. Let's raise a generation that can bring to limelight the rudiments of education, commitment to learning and can advocate and sustain the educational sector.

Writer: Juliet Akomolafe

You can follow us on
Twitter @Etcsines
Instagram @Etcsines
Facebook page @Etcsines 
Share on Google Plus
    Blogger Comment
    Facebook Comment

0 comments:

Post a Comment