The Role of Teachers in Encouraging Students to Strive for Gifts and Awards - ETCSINES


When I was in secondary school, we went to other schools to compete in debates and quizzes. Although, I was not among the participants, I was alert to observe and understand the motivational drive that geared the students towards winning the prizes and awards. Who were the motivators? They were our teachers.

Here, I am not writing theories or scholarly postulations but life experiences. I will express my thoughts here based on what I have seen and experienced, how teachers are the ones who have the responsibilities to position the students psychologically and encourage them to strive at winning gifts and awards. Many people may want to disagree with my line of thought in this write-up. They are not actually my thoughts but expressions of realities.

Ask yourself this question, or just take a moment to think about this: What is the motive behind parents encouraging their children to win certain prizes or awards in school? It will be the pride and desire of every parent, on the prize-giving day, to sit and watch their son or daughter being called out to collect certain prizes or awards for exceptional academic performances. The parent will, as well, love to walk to the platform to take pictures with that child. You know this is true. I do not mean that it is wrong for parents to trigger their children to succeed and make them proud. Of course, parents have a keen role to play in this. In fact, in primary school, my father would tell me that if I could emerge as the student with the first position in my class, he would buy me a bicycle. It is the pride of every parent to watch their children succeed.

I will no dwell on the importance of gifts and awards, because other ETCSINES write-ups for this will have done so. I want to reiterate the fact that teachers have a very keen role to play in encouraging their students contend for awards. How? Parents tell their children, “It is possible; you can do it,” while the teachers do not only tell them it is possible, but show them the possibility; they do not only tell the students that they can do it, but show the HOW to do it.

Let me share a story: We had an English teacher in secondary school. I will mention his name, Mr Bright Julius Amuwha, for the sake of honour. This man cane across a national essay-writing competition organised by Eco Bank. He decided to inform his students, and some of them enrolled. He made them see the possibility of being the best in that competition, and also guided them through. To my amazement, the student who emerged the best in that Eco Bank’s essay competition that year was one of Mr  Bright’s student.

The parents’ input in encouraging their children to contend for prizes is incomplete without the teachers’. 

I wonder the kind of double advantage it will be for a parent to perform both the role of a parent and a teacher.

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